Please enable JavaScript to view this site.

Heroes Of Our Time

Based in Europe at the time of the Battle (although many had been based in England at some point prior to this)

 

10th Reconnaissance Group

 

Moved from Chalgrove in Oxfordshire England over to France being based at Doncourt Les Conflans at the time of the Battle of the Bulge.

 

“Aided Third army and other Allied organisations in the battle to breach the Siegfried Line. Participated in the Battle of the Bulge by flying reconnaissance missions in the combat zone.

 

36th Fighter Group

 

Moved from Kingsnorth England, through France and then to Le Culot, Belguim, the group “Flew armed reconnaissance and close support missions in the Battle of the Bulge.  Aided first army’s push across the Roer River.  Supported operations at the Remagen bridgehead during the assault across the Rhine”.

 

48th Fighter Group

 

Moved from Isbley, England, through France and onto St Trond, Belgium.

 

The group “Received a DUC for action on the 6th Dec 1944: facing intense enemy fire while flying below a heavy overcast, the group struck buildings, entrenchments, and troop concentrations to assist the advance of ground forces against an enemy stronghold north of Julich.  Supported ground operations during the Battle of the Bulge and received third Belgian citation for relentless assaults against the enemy during the battle.”

 

50th Fighter Group

 

After moving from Lymington, Hampshire, England, the group moved through many bases in France.

 

“Assisted in stemming the German offensive in the Saar-Hardt area early in Jan 1945, engaged in the offensive that reduced the Colmar bridgehead in Jan and Feb 1945, and supported the drive that breached the Siegfried line and resulted in the movement of Allied forces into Southern Germany.  Received a DUC for close operation with Seventh Army in Mar during the assault of the Siegfried line; in spite of hazardous of enemy position and difficult weather conditions, the group struck enemy defences and isolated battle areas by destroying bridges, communications, supply areas and ammunition dumps”.

 

67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group

 

After being based at both Membury and Middle Wallop in England the group moved through bases in France, Belgium and Germany.

 

“Took part in the offensive against the Siegfried Line, and in the Battle of the Bulge.  Photographed dams on the Roer River in preparation for the ground offensive to cross the river and aided Allied assault across the Rhine”

 

322nd Bombardment Group

 

Had been based in Rougham and Great Saling (which was renamed to Andrews Field in honour of USAAF General Frank M Andrews who was killed in a plane crash, Iceland May 1943).  Then left England to join bases in France, Belgium and finally Germany.

 

“Bombed bridges, road junctions, defended villages and ordnance depots in the assault on the Siegfried Line.  Flew a number of missions against railroad bridges during the Battle of the Bulge.

 

323rd Bombardment Group

 

Previously based at Horham, Earls Colne and Beaulieu in England moved to bases in France.

 

The group support advances in the Siegfried Line and also “Received a DUC for actions (24th-27th Dec 1944) during the Battle of the Bulge when the group effectively hit transportation installations used by the enemy to bring reinforcements to the Ardennes.”

 

344th Bombardment Group (Medium)

 

Previously based at Stanstead, England moved to bases in France and Belgium.  

 

The group “Supported Allied forces during the Battle of the Bulge, and continued to strike such targets as supply points, communications centres, bridges, marshalling yards, roads, and oil storage tanks until Apr 1945.”

 

352nd Fighter Group

 

After being based at Bodney, near Watton Norfolk for a while the group were moved overseas to Belgium under the control of the Ninth AF in order to carry out operations in the Battle of the Bulge.

 

“During that battle, on I Jan 1945, action by the detachment earned for the group the French Croix de Guerre with Palm: just as 12 of the detachment’s planes were taking off for an area patrol, the airdrome was attacked by about 50 German fighters; in the aerial battle that followed, the 352d shot down almost half the enemy planes without losing any of its own.”

 

354th Fighter Group

 

After being based in England at Greenham Common, Boxted and Lashenden the group moved to France and “Participated in the Battle of the Bulge, by supporting ground forces and by conducting armed reconnaissance operations to destroy enemy troops, tanks, artillery, and rail lines.  Assisted ground forces in their advance across the Rhine”.

 

358th Fighter Group

 

After being based at various English bases (Goxhill, Leiston, Raydon, and High Halden), moved over to France where the group “Received its first DUC for operations from 24 Dec 1944 to 2 Jan 1945 when the group not only supported Seventh Army by attacking rail lines and rolling stock, vehicles, buildings, and artillery, but also destroyed numerous fighter planes during a major assault by the German Air Force against Allied airfields.  Received second DUC for 19-20 Mar 1945, a period in which the 358th destroyed and damaged large numbers of motor transports and thus hampered the

evacuation of German forces that were withdrawing from the area west of the Rhine.”

 

361st Fighter Group

 

Had been based in Bottisham and Little Walden in England but moved a detachment to France for operations in the Battle of the Bulge, and was also involved in the assault across the Rhine.  Did however return to Little Walden in April 1945 until November of the same year.

 

362nd Fighter Group

 

Had been based in England (Wormingford and Headcorn), before moving through bases in France.  The group “Bombed and strafed such targets as flak positions, armoured vehicles, and troop concentrations during the Battle of the Bulge.  Received a second DUC for action over the Moselle-Rhine River Triangle despite the intense antiaircraft fire encountered while flying armed reconnaissance in close cooperation with infantry forces in the area on the 16th Mar 1945, the group hit enemy forces, equipment and facilities its targets including motor transports, armoured vehicles, railroads, railway cars, and gun emplacements.”

 

363rd Tactical Reconnaissance Group

 

Previously being based at Keevil, Rivenhall and Staplehurst in England moved to Maupertuis in France.  The group “Received two Belgian citations for reconnaissance activities, including the group’s support of the assault on the Siegfried Line and its participation in the Battle of the Bulge.  Assisted ninth Army’s drive across the Rhine.”

 

365th Fighter Group

 

Previously based at both Gosfield and Beaulieu in England moved to Azeville, France.  The group had initially received an award for the involvement in the initial phases of the liberation of Belgium but also “Received a second Belgian award during the Battle of the Bulge when the group struck such targets as vehicles, rolling stock, marshalling yards, gun positions, factories, and towns.  Also provided cover during airborne operations across the Rhine”

 

366th Fighter Group

 

Previously based at Membury and Thruxton (now the famous race track) the group moved to various bases in France followed by Belgium.

The group “Flew armed reconnaissance missions over the battle area during the Battle of the Bulge, and escorted bombers during the airborne assault across the Rhine in Mar 1945.”

 

367th Fighter Group

 

Had been based in England (Stony Cross and Ibsley), before moving to various bases in France.

 

The group “Attacked German strong points to aid the Allied push against the Siegfried Line in the fall of 1944. On 26 Dec, during the Battle of the Bulge, escorted C-47's that dropped supplies to Allied troops encircled at Bastogne.  Struck tanks, trucks, flak positions and other objectives in support of the assault across the Rhine”

 

368th Fighter Group

 

Operated at bases in England (Greenham Common and Chilbolten) before moving to bases in France and Belgium.  The group “Participated in the assault against the Siegfried Line, and took part in the Battle of the Bulge by attacking rail lines and trains, marshalling yards, roads and vehicles, armoured columns, and gun positions.  Operated with Allied forces that pushed across the Rhine”

 

370th Fighter Group

 

Had been based at Aldermaston and Andover England before moving to bases in France and Belgium.  The group  “Received a DUC for a mission in support of ground forces in the Hurtgen Forest area on 2 Dec 1944 when, despite bad weather and barrages of antiaircraft and small-arms fire, the group dropped napalm bombs on 3 heavily defended position in Bergstein, setting fire to the village and inflicting heavy casualties on enemy troops defending the area.  Flew armed reconnaissance during the Battle of the Bulge, attacking warehouses, highways, railroads, motor transports, and other targets.  Bombed bridges and docks in the vicinity of Wesel to prepare for the crossing of the Rhine, and patrolled the area as paratroops were dropped on the east bank on 24 Mar”

 

371st Fighter Group

 

Had previously been based at Bisterne, England before moving to various bases in France and then Germany.

 

“Conducted operations that supported Allied ground action in the Battle of the Bulge.  Also received a DUC for a series of attacks against vehicles, factories, buildings, railroad cars, tanks, and gun emplacements 15-21 Mar 1945.”

 

373rd Fighter Group

 

Had been based in Woodchurch England before moving onto to bases in France, Holland and eventually Germany.

“During the Battle of the Bulge, concentrated on the destruction of bridges, marshalling yards, and highways.  Flew armed reconnaissance missions to support ground operations in the Rhine Valley in Mar 1945, hitting airfields, motor transports and other objectives”.

 

386th Bombardment Group

 

Previous bases in England had been Snetterton Heath, Boxted, and Great Dunmow before moving to bases in France and Belgium.

“Focused its attacks primarily on bridges during the Battle of the Bulge, in order to cut off enemy supplies and reinforcements.”

 

387th Bombardment Group

 

Previously based at Chipping Ongar and Stony Cross England, moved to bases in France and Holland.

“Received a DUC for action during the Battle of the Bulge when the group hit strongly defended transportation and communications targets at Mayen and Prum.  Supported the Allied drive into the Reich by attacking bridges, communications centres, marshalling yards, storage installations, and other objectives.”

 

391st Bombardment Group

 

Had previously been based at Marching England before moving to bases in France and Belgium.

 

Received a DUC for missions conducted during the Battle of the Bulge where without fighter escort, and facing attacks by enemy aircraft and intense flak the group “Contributed vital assistance to ground forces during the Battle of the Bulge by attacking heavily defended positions such as bridges and viaducts, 23-26 Dec 1944”

 

394th Bombardment Group

 

Based in Boreham and Holmsley, moved to bases in France and Holland and eventually Germany.

“Took part in the Battle of the Bulge, by hitting communications to deprive the enemy of supplies and reinforcements.”

 

397th Bombardment Group

 

Previously based in England (Gosfield, Rivenhall, and Hurn), the group moved to bases in France and Holland.  

 

The group “Struck the enemy’s communications during the Battle of the Bulge and received a DUC for a mission on 23 Dec 1944 when the group withstood heavy flak and fighter attack to severe a railway bridge at Eller, a vital link in the enemy’s supply line across the Moselle.”

 

404th Fighter Group

 

Had been based at Winkton, England before moving to bases in France, Belgium and eventually Germany.

 

The group “supported Allied operations during the Battle of the Bulge and the establishment of the Remagen bridgehead and the subsequent crossing of the Rhine”

 

405th Fighter Group

 

Previously had been based in Christchurch England, moved to other bases in France, Belgium and eventually Germany.

 

The group “Attacked barges, troops, roads, and warehouses during the Battle of the Bulge, and struck airfields and marshalling yards when the Allies crossed the Rhine in Mar 1945.”

 

406th Fighter Group

 

Had been based at Ashford England before moving to bases in France, Belgium and eventually Germany,

 

“Operated closely with ground forces and flew interdictory missions during the drive to the Moselle-Saar region.  Shifted operations from the Saar basin to the Ardennes and assisted the beleaguered garrison at Bastogne after the Germans had launched the counteroffensive that precipitated the Battle of the Bulge.  Operated almost exclusively within a ten-mile radius of Bastogne from 23-27 Dec 1944, a period for which the group received a second DUC for its attacks on tanks, vehicles, defended buildings, and gun positions. Flew escort, interdictory, and close-support missions in the Ruhr Valley early in 1945 and thus assisted Allied ground forces in their drive to and across the Rhine.”

 

409th Bombardment Group

 

Based at Little Walden England before moving to bases in France.

 

The group “Converted to A-26 aircraft in Dec and participated in the Battle of the Bulge by attacking lines of communication and supply.”

 

410th Bombardment Group

 

Previously had been based both in Birch and Gosfield, England before moving to bases in France.

 

The group “through mid-Dec struck defended villages, railroad bridges and overpasses, marshalling yards, military camps, and communications centres to support the Allied assault on the Siegfried Line.  Participated in the Battle of the Bulge, by pounding marshalling yards, railheads, bridges, and vehicles in the battle area.  Received a DUC for the effectiveness of its bombing in the Ardennes, 23-25 Dec 1944, when the group made numerous attacks on enemy lines of communications.  Flew several night missions in Feb 1945, using B-26's as flare planes, an A-26 for target marking, and A-20's to bomb the objectives. Continued to fly support and interdictory missions, aiding the drive across the Rhine and into Germany, Feb-Apr 1945.”

 

416th Bombardment Group

 

Based at Wethersfield England before moving to bases in France.

 

“Supported the assault on the Siegfried Line by pounding transportation, warehouses, supply dumps, and defended villages in Germany. Converted to A-26 aircraft in Nov. Attacked transportation facilities, strong points, communications centres, and troop concentrations during the Battle of the Bulge. Aided the Allied thrust into Germany by continuing its strikes against transportation, communications, airfields, storage depots, and other objectives, Feb-May 1945. Bombed flak positions in support of the airborne assault across the Rhine in Mar 1945.”

 

435th Troop Carrier Group

 

Previously based in Langar and Welford England

 

“Moved to France in Feb 1945 for the airborne assault across the Rhine; each aircraft towed two gliders in transporting troops and equipment to the east bank of the Rhine on 24 Mar; then the group flew resupply missions to Germany in support of ground forces.”

 

437th Troop Carrier Group

 

Based at Balderton and Ramsbury England the group moved to France in Feb 1945.

 

“Involved in air assault across the Rhine; each aircraft towed two gliders over the east bank and released them near Wesel on 24 Mar 1945.”

 

Also involved in vital missions carrying much needed supplies to ground forces.

 

439th Troop Carrier Group

 

Previously based in England (Balderton and Upottery), the group moved to bases in France, from Sep 1944.

 

The group “Participated in the Battle of the Bulge by releasing gliders with supplies for 101st Airborne Division near Bastogne on 27 Dec 1944.   Each aircraft of the group towed two gliders with troops of 17th Airborne Division and released them near Wesel when the Allies made the air assault across the Rhine on 24th Mar 1945.”

 

The group continued to assist by dropping valuable supplies to the front lines and evacuated patients to hospitals.

 

440th Troop Carrier Group

 

Previously being based at Bottesford and Exeter, before moving to bases in France.

 

“On 26 Dec 1944, during the Battle of the Bulge, it hauled gliders filled with supplies for 101st Airborne Division encircled at Bastogne. In Mar 1945 towed gliders with troops of 17th Airborne Division to the battle area near Wesel during the airborne assault across the Rhine.”

 

Like the 439th the group continued to assist by dropping valuable supplies to the front lines and evacuated patients to hospitals.

 

441st Troop Carrier Group

 

After being based in England at both Langar and Merryfield the group moved to France in Sept 1944.

 

“In Dec 1944, transported ammunition, rations, medicine, and other supplies to troops of 101st Airborne Division surrounded by the enemy at Bastogne.  Released gliders carrying troops of 17th Airborne Division near Wesel on 24 Mar 1945 when the Allies launched the airborne assault across the Rhine.  Hauled gasoline to armoured columns in Germany after the allies crossed the Rhine”

 

474th Fighter Group

 

Had been based at Moreton England before moving to bases in France, Belgium and Germany.  The group participated in the Battle of the Bulge; and patrols along the route of the airborne assault across the Rhine in Mar 1945.”

 

 

Source / Copyright: https://media.defense.gov/2010/Sep/21/2001330256/-1/-1/0/AFD-100921-044.pdf