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Heroes Of Our Time

Airfield Information

 

Name

RAF Cheddington / RAF Marsworth / RFC Cheddington / USAAF Station 113

Opened

February 1917 (WW1) March 1942 (WW2)

Closed

1952

Runways

Concrete landing surfaces and looped hard standings

Hangers

4 x T2

Location

6 miles ENE of Aylesbury and just East of Long Marston village

OS Ref

SP909159

Current Usage

Farmland / Industry

Notes

Was briefly used in 1917 during WW1 as an aerodrome

Links

http://www.ukairfieldguide.net/airfields/Cheddington

http://www.americanairmuseum.com/place/78

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Cheddington

 

 

Details

 

During the Second World War, Cheddington Airfield opened in March 1942 as a satellite station to RAF Wing, with 26 Operational Training Unit, Vickers Wellington bombers.

 

In September 1942 the airfield was transferred to the United States Army Air Forces. The Eighth Air Force 44th Bombardment Group was assigned to Cheddington, and three Consolidated B-24 Liberator squadrons (66th, 67th, 68th) had arrived from the United States. However, Eighth Air Force wanted to move the Liberator groups to Norfolk, and the 44th moved to RAF Shipdham in October.

 

With the movement of the Americans to Norfolk, the RAF transferred the No. 26 OTU back to Cheddington.

 

It was again transferred to the USAAF Eighth Air Force in August 1943 to become station 113, with Consolidated B-24 Liberator bombers of the Combat Crew Replacement Center, 8th Air Force. Also the 50th Fighter Squadron (8th Reconnaissance Group) was assigned to the station 15 March - 12 April 1944, but was not made operational.

 

In 1944 specialist USAAF units arrived to perform special operations missions from the airfield, performing night leaflet drops over occupied areas of Europe, working with various special operations organizations, as well as electronic countermeasure (ECM) missions.

 

The 36th Bombardment Squadron were based here between August 1944 until January 1945, and before that in June 1944 the 803BS were based here, both of which flew missions with the RAF 100 Group.

 

The results of these special operations missions was that the majority of surrendering German troops carried Safe Conduct Passes dropped by these squadrons.

 

The 36th Bomb Squadron flew specially equipped B-17s and B-24s to jam enemy early warning radars and telecommunications, screen assembly and inbound flights of allied bombers, and to spoof the enemy into thinking that other bomber formations (nonexistent) were assembling. This early form of electronic warfare was very successful in disrupting German forces.

 

 

Images

 

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© Stephen Hutton

 

Aerial shot of RAF Cheddington

 

 

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© Stephen Hutton

 

Iredell Hutton Visiting The Station 113 Memorial

 

 

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Click to open

 

© Stephen Hutton

 

Station 113 Sign

 

 

Squadron Information

 

26 Operational Training Unit

Dates

March 1942

Planes

Vickers Wellington Bombers

44th

Bombardment Group

Dates

September 1942

Planes

B-24 Liberator

Combat Crew Replacement Center

8th Air Force

Dates

August 1943

Planes

B-24 Liberator

50th Fighter Squadron (8th Reconnaissance Group)

Dates

15 March - 12 April 1944

Planes

-

850th Bombardment Squadron

Dates

11 - 27 May 1944

Planes

B-24 Liberator

858th Bombardment Squadron

Dates

19 June - 10 August 1944

Planes

B-24 Liberator

406th Bombardment Squadron

Dates

5 August 1944 - 16 March 1945

Planes

B-24 Liberator

36th

Bombardment Squadron

Dates

15 August 1944 – 28 February 1945

Planes

Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress

B-24 Liberator